Cyber Security Business Blog

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“If you’re in cyber security, you’ve got a problem,” said Scott Borg, CEO of Cyber Consequences Unit. C-level cyber security people may be topped out career-wise in their organizations because management may not understand what they do and security terminology is alien to businesspeople. Speaking on the “Economics of Cybersecurity,” Borg advocated that his security audience explain the value they produce in economic terms that are familiar to other C-level executives. Otherwise, cybersecurity executives may be left out of the C-level loop because their terminology in describing their work defending company assets is unfamiliar to people who work in other ...
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Average dwell time, where a hacker inhabits a breached system, is 200 days, said Bob Stasio of DreamIt Ventures, a cybersecurity company that hunts for intruders on organization systems. He has worked in security positions for IBM, NSA, FAA and NASA. Addressing Cyber Security Summit 2018, Stasio said that 80 percent of hacks are stopped by Tier 1 security systems – firewalls, NIST standards, and the like. To prevent larger threats from gaining significant dwell time on your system, it’s time to go from perimeter protection to threat hunting. Stasio introduced a high-level system view of the approach he employs, ...
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“Everything today is a computer,” declared Cyber Security Summit 2018 keynoter Bruce Schneier, CTO, IBM Resilient. IoT is the “computerization” of the whole world, making exponentially complex the safeguarding of most of our devices. Schneier, author of many security-related books and the popular Schneier on Security blog, presented “Click Here to Kill Everybody,” the name of both his presentation and his latest book. He listed six lessons to take from the dynamics influencing cybersecurity today. Most software is poorly written and insecure because it’s designed to be fast and cheap, instead of good. The Internet was never designed with security ...
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Based on their behavior, cyber attackers seem to agree that old, proven tools are hard to beat. Email remains a cost-effective go-to tool for launching a cyber assault, relying on a little help from the human element. Brandon Reid, Enterprise Sales Manager at Mimecast, an email security company, presented Anatomy of an Email-Borne Attack at Cyber Security Summit 2018. Email is the prime launch vehicle for phishing attacks, and it accounts for the preponderance of attacks – 91 percent – he said. Not only that, email is effective – about 30 percent of emailed phishing attacks were opened, according to ...
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David Tyson, the CEO of CISO Insights, spoke to attendees of Cyber Security Summit 2018 about the top measures to take to protect security systems from cyber attacks. He began by visiting old challenges related to patches, viruses and denial of service attacks that persist as they have for the past 20 years. Out of every 101 emails, one is malicious, he said. Data security continues to be an issue, as well as faulty program installations. Cybersecurity is a weakest link disruption, he noted. You can spend $1 million, but if someone leaves their password taped to their monitor security ...
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Public policy trends drive what will happen with future cybersecurity regulation. Matthew Rhoades, Managing Director of the Cybersecurity and Technology Program at the Aspen Institute, reviewed four current top-line trends to attendees at Cyber Security Summit 2018. Rhoades’ list and comments: Data security and sensitivity is a driver in current discussions and legislation, domestically and worldwide. GDPR is a European example of a privacy regime coming to the fore. In reaching beyond the EU to set privacy standards, GDPR is establishing what may become a precedent for others to follow. It imposes strict limits on companies doing business with EU ...
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professionals at a conference seminar
For the past eight years, the Cyber Security Summit in Minneapolis has brought people with different viewpoints on cybersecurity issues together to hear from experts, learn about trends and discuss actionable solutions. Our 2018 Summit was no different and we’d like to thank you once again for joining us! In addition to the annual 2-day Summit, this year we hosted multiple half-day events on Tuesday. These sessions focused on healthcare & medical device cybersecurity, DevSecOps for practitioners, GDPR and cybersecurity for small and mid-size businesses. Feedback from attendees Here’s what attendees had to say about Cyber Security Summit 2018: "Excited ...
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conference in large room with people at tables listening to speaker
The 2018 Cyber Security Summit is just around the corner and we’re looking forward to spending three days with the top cybersecurity professionals from across the globe. We’ve made some changes since last year, so we thought it would be helpful prepare you with a rundown of everything you need to know. Feel free to bookmark this post for reference as you prepare for this year’s Summit. Why Minneapolis, Minnesota? Squarely centered geographically and home to many Fortune 500 multinationals, Minnesota bridges the divide between the technology sector on one coast and policymakers from the other to form an operational and innovative ...
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With technology evolving on a daily basis and an increasing amount of data to secure, it’s no surprise that the industry of cybersecurity is a fast paced one. “The fact that there is not just one single most influential trend in cybersecurity but a confluence of many is very influential to the nature of the industry,” says Cyber Security Summit co-chair and 2018 keynote Stefanie Horvath. Horvath received her master’s degree in Military Strategic Studies from the United States Army War College. Today she serves as the Executive IT Director for Minnesota IT Services and concurrently serves in the Army ...
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young professionals collaborating
Just as we think we are starting to get a handle on Millennials in the workforce, a new generation is changing the game. Enter Gen Z. The oldest members of Gen Z (those born after 1996) are hitting 21 and 22 years old and thus, entering the workforce. And the industry that is hungry to have them? Cybersecurity. According to the Department of Homeland Security, there are half a million cybersecurity-related job openings in the United States and the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts the need for 1.8 million additional cybersecurity professionals to fill the workforce gap by 2022. What ...
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